Education in English for students of Chemistry

The four-semester MSc program in Chemistry

Last update:  Apriil 10, 2007

 Supervisor:  Prof. Zoltán Homonnay  

The aim of the training is to educate chemists who are able to view and handle problems from the technical-economical point of view with a widely applicable and thorough knowledge of chemistry, the related disciplines and foreign languagues. These chemists are also expected to have an insight into some specific fields of chemistry by possessing additional knowledge and skills. The graduated chemists (MSc) are expected to be able to handle and solve problems on their own on the fields of research and technical development, to synthesise and transform chemicals, analyse them and elucidate their structure as well as to take up position in the chemical industry or in related spheres of economy.

For students with BSc degree the minimum official duration of the MSc program is four semesters (the numbering of the semesters in the followig is based on this minimum duration). However, according to our experience they usually need 6 semesters to get the degree. This is because due to differences between universities it is almost always necessary to develop the student’s knowledge by taking up catch-up programs that are essential for the chosen special direction.

After completing their studies and having their thesis accepted the students are awarded an MSc degree. If a student fulfilled the requirements of a specialisation module then a written statement on the specialisation is also issued. The MSc degree qualifies to take up positions in the relevant fields and to enlist for further studies, including the studies for a higher (PhD) degree.

A total of 120 credits is to be collected (see the detailed study plan of the Program). The general load of the students during the 4 semesters (nominally 15 weeks per semester - again, it is to be noted that although the minimum official duration of the MSc program is four semesters, students usually need 6 semesters to get the degree.) is about 30 contact hours per week (chpw). About 90% of the studies are chemistry related. The curriculum consists of more detailed studies of the general aspects of chemistry and specialisation in chosen fields. The lectures fall into one of two categories: semi-optional and elective (special) courses. (The students also have the opportunity to join any of the athletic societies of the University Sports Club-BEAC). The semi-optional courses provide the student with a more detailed description of the general aspects of chemistry and give an introduction into the specific fields of chemistry. The students have to complete a certain number of semi-optional courses from a given selection. For instance, the overall load of the completed semi-optional lectures (given in contact hours per week units - chpw) has to reach a minimum value of 14 chpw by the end of the MSc program. Note that the chpw value (in the majority of cases) equals the credit value of the course. (Govermnent decree defines a credit as a total workload of students consisting of 30 hours of study including contact hours as well as preparation of home works and studying for examinations etc.)

The special lecture courses discuss the special methodics and aspects of chemistry and the related natural sciences (Physics, Biology, Geology, Environmental Sciences, Mathematics, etc.). The list of such elective courses is published yearly by the Faculty. The students have to complete a minimum load of 18 chpw of special lecture courses by the end of their MSc course. Any of the semi-optional lecture courses which are above their 14 chpw limit can be accounted for as special lecture course.

The third major component of the advanced level of chemist training is the thesis project in the 2nd and 3rd semester which consists of the individual research of the student and the writing up of a thesis on the basis of the achievements. The gradualy increasing freedom of the studies in the advanced training and the individual research work of the thesis project helps the students to get acquinted with the scientific life of the Departments and later become involved in it.

Although the chemist training rests on a well developed frame of basic and advanced studies, the persistent requirement of compacting and updating and also the changing needs of the students call for a constant development of the training. A possible way to fulfill these requirements is the launching of Specialisation Modules during the MSc program which helps the broadening of the skills and knowledge of the students on a specific field. The specialisation modules are organised by the Departments and the students are free to enlist to them. The specialisation modules have fixed programmes which are part of the advanced chemist training. At present there are five different modules running at the Institute:

EXAMS

At the end of the semesters the students have to give an account of their knowledge attained during the semester. In the case of lectures the students have to pass an exam (oral or written) while the laboratory practices and other courses are marked by the supervisor(s). During the basic training the students have to pass cumulative exams on the major fields of chemistry which include the subject of the closely related lectures and laboratory practices.

The concluding act of chemist training is the state examination where the students prove their preparedness to the chemist profession and answer the examination commitee's questions about the thesis.

A glossary containing the explanation of the frequently used terms and symbols can be found on the last page of this file.


Courses of MSc program in Chemistry including
a suggested arrangement of the semi-optional and special courses

Comments:
The courses of specialisation modules are part of the above system.
-  contact hours per week (in the majority of cases this unit equals a credit)
†† -  the numbering of semesters is shown in terms of the minimum official duration of the MSc program (four semesters). However, according to our experience students  usually need 6 semesters to get the degree.
* - a suggested arrangement which fulfills the requirements.
** - The placement is organised by the department which registered the student for the thesis project.


List of the semi-optional lecture courses

COURSE

LOAD

SEMESTER††

Analytical Chemistry II.

2

1st or 3rd

*Biochemistry II.

2

1st or 3rd

*Bioinorganic Chemistry

2

1st or 3rd

*Bioorganic Chemistry

2

1st or 3rd

*Environmental Geochemistry

2

1st or 3rd

Chemical Technology of Macromolecular Materials

3

1st or 3rd

Mineral Resources

2

1st or 3rd

*NMR Spectroscopy I.

2

1st or 3rd

Operations of Chemical Engineering

2

1st or 3rd

Organic Spectroscopy

2

1st or 3rd

*Separation Techniques

2

1st or 3rd

Theoretical Chemistry II.

2

1st or 3rd

Theory of Organic Reaction Mechanisms

2

1st or 3rd

*X-ray Diffraction

2

1st or 3rd

*Chemical Harms in and Protection of Environment

2

2nd or 4th

Colloid Chemistry II.

2

2nd or 4th

Computational Statistical Mechanics

2

2nd or 4th

Electrochemistry

3

2nd or 4th

*Environmental Chemical Analysis

2

2nd or 4th

Experimental Design

2

2nd or 4th

Molecular Structure

2

2nd or 4th

*NMR Spectroscopy II.

2

2nd or 4th

* Nuclear Techniques in Structural Chemistry

2

2nd or 4th

Organic Reaction Mechanisms

2

2nd or 4th

Physical Organic Chemistry

2

2nd or 4th

Process Modelling

2

2nd or 4th

Reaction Kinetics

3

2nd or 4th

Statistical Thermodynamics

3

2nd or 4th

*Theoretical Molecular Chemistry

2

2nd or 4th


Chemical Informatics Module

The module is coordinated and supervised by the Departments of Physical Chemistry and of Theoretical Chemistry. Students choosing this specialisation module are required to collect about 30 creit points (about 30 chpw). This study load must include 8 lectures (2 chpw each) whith the only restriction that at least one lecture is to be completed from each of the Blocks A, B, and C.

BLOCKS/COURSES

semester

hours

Compulsory Labs

Computational Structure Investigation Lab II.
(Theoretical Chemistry Special Lab)

2nd or 4th

8 chpw

Physical Chemistry Special Lab

2nd or 4th

8 chpw

Block A

Basics of Computational Chemistry
1st to 4th
20x2 chpw

Block B

Operating Systems and Programing
1st to 4th
8x2 chpw

Block C

Hardware and Network
1st to 4th
5x2 chpw

Environmental Chemistry Module

The module is coordinated and supervised by the Department of Chemical Technology and Environmental Chemistry.

COURSES

semester

hours

*Bioinorganic Chemistry

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

*Environmental Chemistry

1st

2 chpw

*Chemical Harms in and Protection of Environment

2nd

2 chpw

Soil and Environment

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Multiple choice (4 out of 6)

*Environmental Chemical Analysis

2nd

2 chpw

*Environmental Geochemistry

2nd or 3rd

2 chpw

*Separation Techniques

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Environmental Colloid Chemistry

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Nuclear Aspects of Environment Protection

2nd or 4th

2 chpw

Air and Water Chemical Qualification

1st or 3rd

2 chpw


Materials Chemistry Module

This module is coordinated and supervised by the Departments of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry and of Colloid Chemistry. In order to complete this module the students have to take the following courses:

COURSES

semester

hours

Compulsory

New Chemical Methods in Materials Sciences

1st and 2nd

2x2 chpw

Structure Investigations of Materials

1st and 2nd

2x2 chpw

**Colloid Chemistry Lab II.

1st

4 chpw

***Structure Investigations of Materials Lab

2nd

8 chpw

Multiple choice (4 out of 14)

*Advanced Electrochemistry  
3 chpw
Biocompatible Surfaces

2nd or 4th

2 chpw

*Colloid Chemistry II

2nd or 3rd

2 chpw

Electrochemical Techniques in Corrosion and Electrodepositing of Metals
2nd or 4th

2 chpw

Electrostatic Interactions in Colloid Systems
1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Interfacial Behaviors of Macromolecules
1st or 2nd
2 chpw
*Interfacial Chemistry
2nd or 4th
2 chpw
Mass Spectrometry
2nd or 4th
2 chpw
Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Iits Applications  
2 chpw
Nuclear Methods in Materials Science
1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Optical Spectroscopy  

2 chpw

Sol-gel Methods

1st to 4th

2 chpw
Synthesizing Macromolecules

1st to 4th

2 chpw

XPS Technique and Its Application in Surface Chemistry

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

One of the following Special Labs must be completed

Specializations in Colloid Chemistry Special Lab

2nd

8 chpw

Specializations in Analytical Chemistry Special Lab
2nd

8 chpw


Molecular Structure Studies Module

The module is coordinated and supervised by the Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry. The enlisting students have to take up the following fundamental courses and 2 from the set of 5. In order to be allowed to take up an advanced course the student is expected to pass the exam on the related fundamental course by the begining of the 2nd semester

COURSES

semester

hours

*NMR Spectroscopy

1st and 2nd

2x2 chpw

*X-ray Diffraction

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Optical Spectroscopy

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Mass Spectroscopy

2nd

2 chpw

*Theoretical Molecular Chemistry

2nd

2 chpw

Multiple choice (2 out of 5)

*Separation Techniques

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

High Energy Spectroscopy

1st or 3rd

2 chpw

Electron Diffraction

2nd or 4th

2 chpw

CD Spectroscopy

2nd or 4th

2 chpw

*Nuclear Techniques in Structural Chemistry

2nd or 4th

2 chpw


Pharmaceutical Chemistry Module

The module is coordinated and supervised by the Department of Organic Chemistry. The enlisting students have to follow the directives set by the Department for specialisation in organic chemistry.

COURSES

semester

hours

Compulsory Biology Foundation Course

1st and 2nd

2x2 chpw

*Biochemistry II

1st

2 chpw

*Bioorganic Chemistry

1st or 2nd

2 chpw

*Bioinorganic Chemistry

3rd

2 chpw

Structure and Action of Medicines

3rd and 4th

2x2 chpw

Pharmaceutical R&D

4th

2 chpw

Multiple choice (3 out of 4)

Alkaloid Chemistry

3rd

2 chpw

Steroid Synthesis

3rd

2 chpw

Chemistry of Antibiotics

4th

2 chpw

Biologicaly Active Peptides

4th

2 chpw


SEMI-OPTIONAL LABORATORY PRACTICE in the 1st semester

These courses aim the broadening of the knowledge attained at basic courses. Each Department at the Institute of Chemistry organises its own version of Semi-optional Laboratory Practice and the student can choose freely from that selection. The only set requirement is the minimal amount of hours per week to be completed by the student during the 1st semester. The students have to enlist to the Semi-optional Laboratory Practice at the organising Department by the end of the 6th semester. Before choosing the Semi-optional Laboratory Practice the students are advised to consult the Department where they intend to carry out their Thesis Project or the Department which organises any Specialisation Module they intend to participate in.


SPECIAL LABORATORY ASSIGNMENT in the 2nd semester

These courses aim the attainment of special practical knowledge and skills. The students have to complete three Laboratory Assignments in the 2nd semester. The Laboratory Assignments are organised by the Departments of the Institute of Chemistry and the students are informed about the current available selection in the 1st semester. The enlisting to a Laboratory Assignment usually requires preliminary acceptance by the Department. Before choosing the Laboratory Assignments the students are advised to consult the Department where they intend to carry out their Thesis Project or the Department which organises any Specialisation Module they intend to participate in.


SEMI-OPTIONAL LECTURES

These courses form the basis of the MSc program in chemistry. The students have to complete at least 18 chpw worth from this selection by the end of the program. Some of these courses are also part of specialisation modules and any of them can be chosen as an optional course.

Analytical Chemistry II. (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: To give an overview of methods of the research and control of pharmaceuticals. Programme: This lecture gives an overview on the subjects of pharmaceutical research with emphasis on the industrial and official analysis carried out in the field. The latter includes the applications of methods in the analysis of pharmaceutical base materials and active components, with emphasis on the structural and content determinations of trace contaminants. (HPLC by diode array detector, UV spectroscopic, GC-MS and LC-MS methods). Chiral chromatography, automated methods, validation.

Biochemistry II. (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Pharmaceutical Chemistry module)

Objective: Extension of the chemical education to biochemistry, biology and physiology by demonstrating the structure and function of bio (cell) membranes in the various forms of bioregulation. Programme: 1.Biomembranes. The structure of cell membranes. Interaction and function of lipid, protein and carbohydrate constituents. The micellar fluid mosaic crystal structure. Transport processes in the biomembranes. Methods in membrane research. 2. The hormonal bioregulation. Metabolism and action of mechanism. The receptor model of hormon effects. Steroid hormones. Thyroid hormones. 3. Peptide hormones and their effects. Plasma membrane receptors and mediators of hormonal action. The seconder messengers and the role of cyclic nucleotides. The hormon regulation of Ca-metabolism. The pancreatic hormones. The hormones of hypothalamus and pituitary. 4. Biogen amines and natural polyamines. Catecholamines and their metabolism. Mediators (histamine, serotonine, kinins, prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes). The role and metabolism of natural polyamines in the regulation of biological processes (cell proliferation, cancer). Practical methods in the biochemistry of biogen amines and polyamines.

Bioinorganic Chemistry (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry modules)

Objective: Treatment at a molecular level of topics related a) to the interrelationship between the geological and biological environments; b) to the diverse roles of metals and metal complexes and some non-metallic elements in biological systems, and c) to some toxicologically, therapeutically, or environmentally relevant issues. Programme: The historical development of bioinorganic chemistry. Chemical evolution (a brief survey), and the biochemical evolution of iron and copper. The biogeochemical cycling of the elements. The molecular mechanism of the entry and incorporation of cations, anions, and neutral molecules into the biological systems. The bioinorganic chemistry of the essential (Na, K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and some important metals (V, Cr, Ni). The biochemistry of oxygen and nitrogen; dioxygen and dinitrogen metal complexes. Biomineralization. The biochemistry of some toxic metals (Al, Cd, Hg, Pb); natural detoxification processes. Metaldependent diseases and their chemotherapy. Metals and metal complexes applied in therapy: antitumor metal complexes; gold complexes in the treatment of rheunmatoid arthritis; lithium therapy. Physico-chemical methods used to study the equilibria, structures, and kinetics of bioinorganic systems.

Bioorganic Chemistry (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Pharmaceutical Chemistry module)

Programme: Pharmacokinetics: Drug distribution, binding to macromolecules, separation techniques, affinity chromatography. Metabolism: Drug labeling with radioisotopes, microsomal conversion, conjugation reactions, prodrug-drug conversion, biosynthesis of peptide hormones. Chemotherapy: Structure of the bacterial cell wall, antibacterial compounds, antibiotics, cancer chemotherapy. Pharmacodynamics: Structure and function of receptors, inhibition of proteolytic enzymes, opioid peptides.

Environmental Geochemistry (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Environmental Chemistry module)

Objective: To enlarge the knowledge regarding geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of our environment, to create a geochemical survey-capability. Programme: Facts effecting the elements‘ distribution and migration. Rock-water interaction. Disintegration and its role in soil structure. Sorption- and desorption processes, hydrolysis. The bases of land-geochemistry. Methodology of land-geochemical photography. Geochemical dams. The role of environmental pollution in the above mentioned processes.

Chemical Technology of Macromolecular Materials (1st or 3rd semester 3+0 chpw)

Objective: Basic relationships of polymer chemistry, and their applications in the industrial preparation, processing and practical use of polymeric materials. Programme: The basic features of the radical polymerization the fundamental relationships of a chain reaction and their application in the processes of industrial polymerization (bulk, solution polymerisation, polymerisation in solid phase, emulsion and suspension polymerization methods). The degree of polymerization and its regulation, the formation of MWD and its regulation, the number and the weight average of molecular weight. The non steady-state of the polymerization, investigation of the individual elementary reactions. The heat transfer and its importance for the polymerization. The importance of copolymers. Determination of the composition of the copolymer. Calculation of the reactivity ratios. The rate of the copolymerization. The average sequence-lenght and the microstructure of the copolymers. Reactivity theories. The different ionic polymerization reactions. The basic relationships of living polymerization and their use in the practice. The Poisson-distribution. The stereoregular polymerization. The ionic copolymerization. The degradation and ageing of polymers. The theory and practice of stabilization, the planned life-time. The processing of polymers, mechanochemistry of polymers. The structure-properties relationships. Some special chapters of the recent results of polymer chemistry.

Mineral resources (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw)

Programme: The structure of the Earth. The origin and structure of the Earth's crust. Fundamental aspects of mineralogy (crystallomorphology, crystallography ). The physical and chemical properties of the minerals. Origin and classification of rocks. Introduction to the plate tectonics. Main aspects of the accumulation of raw material deposits. Genetical classification and genetic models of ore types in the framework of the magmatic-volcanic, sedimentary and metamorphic-metasomatic processes. The main raw material resources of Hungary and the Carpathian basin. Field studies on a mineral deposit in Hungary.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy I.-II. (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw; 2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Molecular Structure Studies module)

Objective: Introduction to the theory and possible applications of NMR spectroscopy in the field of chemical structure elucidation. Acquaintance with the basic principles and use of advanced NMR-technique. Programme: Basic principles: magnetic properties of particles – Chemical shift – Spin-spin coupling and coupling constants: first- and higher-order couplings – Geminal-, vicial, long-range couplings – Spin-systems: chemical and magnetic equivalence – Quantum mechanical treatment of NMR: the Hamiltonian and the Schrödinger equation – Spin angular momentum operators – Eingenfunctions – Transition probabilities and selection tules – study of the most important spin-systems (A2–AX–AB, AmXn–AmBn, AMX–ABX, AA’XX’–AA’BB’). Measurement techniques: CW-spectrometers – Spectrum integration – Variable temperature measurements – FT-spectroscopy – Pulsed excitation Control by computer – double resonance – NOE – Gated decoupling – Pulse sequences – DEPT – Measurement of relaxation times – 2D-NMR spectroscopy: COSY – HSC – NOESY – NMR tomography. Applied NMR spectroscopy. 1H-NMR: Saturated open-chain, cyclic and heterocyclic compounds – mobile hydrogens, dynamic NMR (DNMR) spectroscopy, signal-shape analysis – Solvent effect – Shift reagents – Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarisation (CIDNP) – 13C-NMR – Factors influencing the carbon chemical shifts – Field effect – C-NMR characteristics of different types of compounds – Couplings of carbon nuclei – Relaxation mechanisms of carbon nuclei – Resonance of other nuclei (19F, 15N, 17O, 31P).

Operations of Chemical Engineering (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective and programme: to be announced.

Organic Spectroscopy (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: the aim for the lecture is to give an opportunity for organic chemistry students to get acquainted with the most important spectroscopic methods and their use in the structure determination of organic compounds. Programme: 1. Electron spectroscopy: types of electronic excitations; absorption of chromphores. 2. Infrared spectroscopy: group frequencies; modern methods in vibrational spectroscopy. 3. NMR: chemical shifts; intensities, spin-spin coupling; dynamical NMR; multi-dimensional methods. 4. Circular dichroism: symmetry of molecules, theoretical bases; sector rules; CD of natural products. 5. Mass spectroscopy: theoretical bases and practice; investigation of macromolecules.

Separation Techniques (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Environmental Chemistry and Molecular Structure Studies modules)

Objective: Summary of the important separation methods for resolution of groups and components. Basic principles for optimization, for development of methods and for cooperation of chemists and chromatographers. Programme: High-performance liquid chromatography, gaschromatography, gel and ion- exchange chromatography. Electromigraton techniques. Basic principles and theory of chromatography: chromatographs, packings, detectors and injectors. Adsorption and partition chromatography. Chemically bonded stationary phases in normal and reversed-phase chromatography. Isocratic and gradient elution. Analytical, semipreparative and preparative chromatography. Chiral separations. Derivatization and detection. Prediction of chromatographic behaviour. Structure determinations by chromatography. Investigation of biological componds with chromatographic methods. New trends in chromatography.

Theoretical Chemistry II. (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw)

Programme: Glossary of quantum chemistry: qualitative MO theory, Hartree-Fock method, Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method, atomic basis sets. DFT methods. Methods for including electron correlation (CI, MCSCF, Coupled-Cluster, MBPT). Semiempirical methods. Quantum chemical treatment of periodic systems.

Theory of Organic Reaction Mechanisms (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: Introduction to the electron structure of organic molecules, as well as to their static and dynamic stereochemistry with emphasis on the most important results in research. Programme: Molecular orbitals and stereochemisrty. Conjugated systems. Molecule diagrams. Transition state. Methods for investigation of reaction mechanisms. Types of organic reactions. Factors influencing the reaction rate.

X-ray diffraction (1st or 3rd semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Molecular Structure Studies module)

Objective: To determine the composition, constitution, conformation and configuration (absolute and relative) of organic molecules in the crystal state by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results. Input data for molecular mechanical calculations and computer assisted molecular modeling. Programme: Principles of X-ray diffraction (Bragg scattering). Fourier transformation of electron density, atomic scattering factors, structure factors, crystal symmetries. Solution of the crystallographic phase problems: vector and direct methods. Refinement of the atomic parameters by use of isotropic and anisotropic thermal parameters. Interpretation of the molecular structure in terms of bond lengths, angles, torsion angles, atomic least squares planes, puckering parameters etc. Experimental techniques, computer controlled diffractometry.

Chemical Harms in and Protection of Environment (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Environmental Chemistry module)

Objective: Introduction to environmental problems; gas-, liquid- and solid-state chemical pollutants, some protective solutions especially in the field of water-protection. Programme: Causes of environmental harms, effects on human living conditions, necessity of environmental management. Sources of environmental pollution; air pollutants, energy-production, transport (traffic). Solid-state pollutants, their main types, handling and storage/ deposition of household-, industrial wastes. Liquid-stage pollutants, types of wastewater, natural and artificial wastewater treatment procedures, treatment and deposition of wastewater sludge.

Colloid Chemistry II. (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: a synthesis of the treatments of colloid systems and problems. Developing the critical approach of theories. Programme: Interfaces (philosophical problems, continuos and discrete treatments). Consequences of the excess free energy (capillary phenomena, curved interfaces, adsorption). Theories of dispersion stability. Self association of surfactants (micelle and vesiculum formation, solubilization, mixed micelles, polymer-surfactant interaction). Thin liquid films and foams. Interaction between colloid particles (concentrated dispersions) and interaction of colloid systems with external fields.

Computational Statistical Mechanics (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw)

Programme: There are two versions of this course. The first one covers the theoretical background: elementary mechanics, chaotic motion, statistical mechanics. Emphasis is laid on Gibbs ensembles and methods for calculating molecular systems. A second semester is possible on hydrodynamics, fluctuations, transport phenomena and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The second version assumes a background in statistical thermodynamics, and discusses the most important techniques in the calculation of many-body atomic (molecular) systems. This version is intended for those who pursue research in computer simulation in chemical physics.

Electrochemistry (2nd or 4th semester 3+0 chpw)

Objective: Teaching the basic concepts of electrochemistry. Programme : Electrochemical equilibria in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, structure of the electrical double layer, electrode kinetics, electrosorption, electrocatalysis, organic electro-chemistry, photoelectro-chemistry, electrochemical technology.

Environmental Chemical Analysis (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Environmental Chemistry module)

Objective: A basic understanding of environmental chemical analysis and its applications. Programme: The role and importance of environmental analysis. Classical methods. Spectrometric and other methods. Sampling. Analysis of pollutants in the atmosphere. Organic pollutants. Nature and type of water pollutants. Wastes and pollutants in soil.

Experiment Design (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: Introduction to the basic principles and general methods of experiment design founded on mathematical statistics. Programme: Cybernetic model of experimentation. The A-, D-, E-, G- etc. optimal designs of experiments. Construction methods of D-optimal experimental designs. Orthogonal first order designs, factorial designs. Analysis of partial factorial replications. Randomization. Design of experiments for optimization. Box-Wilson method. Estimation of response surface on the basis of second order orthogonal design. Rotatable first and second order designs, decomposition of designs to orthogonal blocks. Evolutionary optimization of industrial processes.

Molecular Structure (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: Interpretation of the parameters of molecular structure on the basis of the application of VSEPR theory taking into consideration the Jahn-Teller effect and the intramolecular migrations. Acquisition of theoretical preparedness to the reception of new results in the field of structural chemistry, and to the treatment of new data. Programme: Basics of VSEPR theory. Investigation of parameters and effects cousing distorsion of preferred molecular structures. Special features of the stereochemistry of transition elements. Interpretation of the structure of clusters by Wade's rules, their reactivity and catalytic effects.

Nuclear Techniques in Structural Chemistry (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Molecular Structure Studies module)

Programme: Selected chapters of nuclear and solid-state physics as a background for Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS); experimental techniques of MS; methods of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS); lifetime, angular correlation and Doppler broadening spectroscopy; muon spin rotation, resonance and relaxation (*SR); formation and decay of heavy exotic atoms.

Organic Reaction Mechanisms (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: Introduction to organic reaction mechanisms with emphasis on the most important results in research. Programme: Aliphatic and aromatic nucleophilic substitution. Reactions involving carbonium ions. Pericyclic reactions. Elimination. Reactions of the carbonyl and carboxyl groups. Carbenes and nitrenes. Radical reactions. Oxidation and reduction. Rearrangements. Photochemical reactions.

Physical Organic Chemistry (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: The methods of physical chemistry used in the elucidation of the mechanism of organic reactions are discussed. Programme: Nonkinetic methods for the elucidation of reaction mechanisms; rate equations of complex reactions; theories of chemical reactions; LFER used in structure and reactivity relationships; isotope effects; environmental effects; characteristics of acids, bases, electrophiles and nucleophiles; homogeneous catalysis.

Process Modelling (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw)

Objective: Introduction to the basic principles and general methods of transport phenomena occurring in chemical laboratories and industry. Programme: Density definition of extensive quantities on different scale. Relations between amounts of different scale. Multilevel, hierarchical modeling: the form of general balance equations independent of scale. Application of general transport equation for turbulent flow. Molecular and turbulent dispersions. Chemical rate equations in turbulent flow. Interpretation of component sources: axiomatic foundation of chemical stoichiometry, linear algebraic interpretation of reaction rates. Residence time distribution and its density function, moments. Response function, Typical models for flow structure: plug flow, perfect mixing, axial dispersion, compartment and combined models.

Reaction Kinetics (2nd or 4th semester 3+0 chpw)

Objective: Teaching the basic concepts of Chemical Kinetics. Programme: Molecular treatment of chemical reactions. Reaction potential energy surfaces. Quasi-equilibrium and dynamic approximation of transition state theory. Variational transition state theory. RRKM theory. Analy-tical and numerical solution of complex mechanisms. Sources of error of steady-state approximations. Reactions in solution. Effect of ionic strength on the rate constant. Effect of dipole moment change during the formation of the transition state. Kinetic salt effect. Isotope effect. Linear free energy relationships and other semiquantitative relations. Kinetics of enzyme reactions. General treatment of acid-base catalysis. Experimental methods for studying the kinetics of reactions. Experimental observation of the transition state. Numerical treatment of experimental data. Exotic behaviour in dynamic systems. Oscillatory reactions. Chaos in chemistry.

Statistical Thermodynamics (2nd or 4th semester 3+0 chpw)

Objective: Teaching the methods and basic concepts of statistical thermodynamics. Programme: Principles of the probabilistic approach. Gibbs ensembles. Distributions in various ensembles. Entropy defined in terms of probability distributions in the different ensembles. Thermodynamic quantities in terms of the partition functions. Calculation of the translational partition function for an ideal gas in the canonical ensemble. Contributions of the translational, rotational and vibrational partition functions to the different thermodynamic quantities. The transition state theory of chemical reactions. Equilibrium constants from the partition functions. Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics. The configurational integral, the cluster integrals, the virial equation. Pair correlation function.

Theoretical Molecular Chemistry (2nd or 4th semester 2+0 chpw; part of the Molecular Structure Studies module)

Programme: The lecture gives an overview on quantum chemical, molecular mechanical and other methods suitable for the determination of various molecular properties. Applicability and reliability of various methods is illustrated on numerous examples. Beside molecular geometry, conformations, molecular vibrations, electric and magnetic properties, excited states and optical activity are discussed. Special emphasis is laid on molecular graphical representations in order to bring the topic closer to interested students with less mathematical background.


ELECTIVE LECTURES

The objective of elective special lecture courses is to provide the specific information the students need in the course of their specialisation. The only requirement they have to fulfill is to complete a certain amount (18 chpw) of special lecture courses by the end of the Program. The Faculty of Science publishes the selection of special lecture courses yearly from which the students are free to choose any chemistry and chemistry related elective courses. Any of the semi-optional lecture courses - above the set limit of 14 chpw - can be accounted for as an elective special course.

 

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Coordinator of  English language program in Chemistry:  Prof.  Zoltán Homonnay
Last update:  February 15, 2007